Old Friends. New Friends.

In the summer of 2016, I had just finished my first draft of a musical I had been working on and had sent the script to my friend Miriam Kook so she could begin composing the music. I was considering what to tackle next. One friend insisted that my next writing project should be about “the gals,” my incredible group of friends, self described as "The Ms. Guided (est. 2009)." A blend of natives and transplants, we had found one another on meetup.com and become fast friends.

Our backstories were fascinating and varied. We had lived in several countries, pursued intriguing careers, had been married for better or worse and most had raised now-adult children. What was clear to us all, as we navigated our advancing years, was that no matter how the world regarded (or ignored) us, we were NOT done yet.

What was keeping me from writing about the gals was that there was no story. No plot. No high stakes. No narrative arc. So, I made one up.

“The Woodstock Tontine” throws a handful of these gals into a fictional premise:

Five women who met in Woodstock in August of 1969 are reunited nearly 50 years later at the funeral of the group’s emotional pulse, Valerie. She is the one who had originally gathered the gals together at the festival and she was the glue who kept the diverse group in touch.

There is BJ, a black women adopted by Jewish parents.

VERONIKA, a self-effacing woman, raised in post WW2 Germany.

SHELLEY, who’s libidinal juices remain as reliable as a maple in the spring.

TRUDY, the world traveler and self-appointed moral compass.

And ROBERTA, who brings them the idea of the tontine—a way to help the gals literally “invest” in their friendship. It is a proposal both tantalizing and morbid.

One by one, the group dwindles, but not before learning much about one another and, even more, about themselves. The blessing of their friendships is how they are able influence each other’s lives. Willing to invest and take the risks that friendship requires, they are also able to net the rewards only real relationships can provide.

I have learned this from the gals of the “Ms. Guided.” I hope others will enjoy the joys, tragedies, bumps and bruises that come with real friendships through the incredible ladies of “The Woodstock Tontine.”

I am grateful to the Women's Theatre Festival NC for featuring the first staged version of “The Woodstock Tontine,” and especially to director Lucia Foster, the devoted actors and the crew. As a rookie playwright, I took what I learned from this festival premiere and the reviews the show received and proceeded to rewrite, edit and shorten the script considerably. It's a better play and, hopefully, it will find its way to other venues in the future, as we draw closer to the 50th anniversary of the summer of love!

—Steffi Rubin